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Foreign Investment in Emerging Markets: International Diversification or Familiarity Bias?
Aug 23, 2017
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Emerging Markets Finance and Trade
Yunxiao Liu, James L. Park & Bumjean Sohn 1 School of Entrepreneurship and Management, ShanghaiTech University, 100 Haike Road, Shanghai, 201210, China; Email: yxliu84@163.com 2 Corresponding Author. Korea University Business School, 145 Anam-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul, 136-701, Republic of Korea. E-mail: jpark1@korea.ac.kr. Telephone: +82-2-3290-2824. 3 Korea University Business School, 145 Anam-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul, 136-701, Republic of Korea. E-mail: sohnb@korea.ac.kr. Telephone: +82-2-3290-2832 DOI:10.1080/1540496X.2017.1369403 http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/1540496X.2017.1369403 Abstract This study empirically tests whether foreign investors take advantage of international diversification when investing in emerging Asian markets. Using the 2007–2008 financial crisis as identification, we find that firms with higher foreign ownership had better stock returns during the financial crisis. Moreover, the diversification effect exists in five out of the eight emerging markets and is stronger in markets with a lower dynamic conditional correlation with the global market index. We also find that foreign investors prefer firms with a lower international sales ratio. In conclusion, the evidence consistently suggests that foreign investors take advantage of diversification effects. KEYWORDS: Emerging markets, familiarity bias, financial crisis, home bias, international diversification
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